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RARB REVIEW

Group: Mighty Prince Singers, a.k.a. Talk of da Town
Album: People Get Ready

Total time: 36:02, 12 songs
Recorded 1997

Ordering Information

CDs: $17, includes shipping charges.

Prince/SF Productions
2674 24th Ave.
San Francisco, CA 94116-3038

Track Listing

  1. People Get Ready (4.8)
  2. T.A. Thompson (4.8)
  3. Walk on the Wild Side (5.0)
  4. Christians' Automobile (4.2)
  5. Heaven Help us All (3.8)
  6. Hearse Wheels Rollin' (5.4)
  7. How Do I Say Goodbye (5.0)
  8. Hem of His Garment (5.6)
  9. When Jesus Comes (5.4)
  10. Somewhere to Lay my Head (5.8)
  11. Higher and Higher (4.8)
  12. People Get Ready (Reprise) (4.7)

Reviews

Overall

Karl Schroeder

I wish there had been more information about the group in this album's liner notes; is this their first album? Have they been together for years? Not knowing whether I should give them kudos for completing a passable first album or critically analyze an advanced project, I had to listen to this one on its face value merits, which were pretty consistently average. I was bothered by the tuning problems apparent throughout the CD, and I also found the soloists to be a little stiff sometimes, especially for a gospel recording. Don't get me wrong; I have no problem listening to a group with some tuning problems here and there, if those details are made up for with an intense feeling and genuine love of music and subject matter. I just felt that the overall feel of the album was a tad too straight and uninventive to make up for its shortcomings. If you're looking for an imperfect but still inspiring group, pass on this one and check out The Fairfield Four or The Persuasions instead.
Rating: 5 (5.4)

Rebecca Christie

It boils down to this: if the Mighty Prince Singers sang at the potluck after church, I would think they were great. If they sang on a stage with the likes of the Persuasions, or the First Cosmopolitan All Male Chorus (quintet out of Raleigh, NC), or any other quality gospel ensemble, they'd be toast.

What the big boys have starts with one thing — voices, voices, voices. Usually five of them. Big voices. Lots of vibrato, and the potential to ring the rafters with a power chord or just a well-placed "Amen". The Mighty Prince Singers have six voices, and not one of them got me sitting up straight, much less offa my feet. Their tempos are fast, yet muted, which makes for nice mellow doo-wop but poor soul-stirring.

Quartet gospel (it's called quartet, even though a lot of it's five-part singing) is somewhat rote. Arrangements are basic, repetitive. Tuning sometimes suffers, since voices are intuitive rather than trained. Sometimes this can be lived with, other times it gets under your skin. There's not a ton of variety — there are fast songs, slow songs, shout songs and hymns, and anyone who's not attached to the style is only going to notice a difference in how fast you're supposed to clap. But if they listen to a good quartet and then the Mighty Prince Singers, they'll feel like Aretha Franklin just got replaced with Des'ree. It's not that Des'ree is that bad, it's just, well — not enough there.
Rating: 5 (5.1)

Sarah Andrews Cook

The Mighty Prince Singers is a 5-member (with an additional guest vocalist on three tracks) gospel a cappella group from San Francisco. They have certain positive characteristics that carry pretty much throughout the album: Their tuning and blend are almost always without fault and their soloists are talented singers who are completely in sync with the style of the music they're doing.

There are, however, several aspects to this album that get in the way of my full enjoyment of it. For much of the album (especially the first half) I found the bass to be too prominent in the mix, distracting me from the soloist. The soloists are expressive and they should be the most obvious part of the song, but sometimes they sound like just another part of the mix, overshadowed by the combined forces of the other singers. Several of the arrangements provide little variety from verse to verse, and with little dynamic variation this leads to songs that travel along at a plateau level, without much to keep the listener interested.

I'm guessing that some of these problems are due to whatever recording techniques they used, and would disappear in a live setting, but that sort of speculation can't really have any bearing on a review of the CD. If you're only interested in contemporary a cappella and not gospel a cappella, I probably wouldn't recommend this CD to you. If you like gospel, however, you'll probably enjoy it more.
Rating: 6 (6.2)

Benjamin Stevens

The Mighty Prince Singers consists of five voices (all male), ranging from a deep but substantially-miked bass to some faint higher voices often paired up. The repertoire is all gospel/spiritual, consistently mild and, sadly, typically unexciting. For a group with so much experience singing together (35 years according to the liner notes), there is little sense of togetherness and a decided lack of energy. The group has long since found its pattern and sticks to it through all of its songs: an independent, "bom"-syllabic bass line, muffled middle voices and a pale, unsoulful lead, with paired tenor voices supplying much of the harmony. The choice of lead is almost never good (vocal quality being my biggest complaint); the arrangement of songs strikingly consistent and unfortunately bland. One song is too much like the next (finding its epitome in a reprise which precisely duplicates the first time through). Overall, then, a well-tuned but only decently sung collection of spirituals, lacking any spark of spirituality.
Rating: 5 (4.2)

John Magruder

For an album full of inspirational music meant to tweak your soul in a decidedly Christian way, I was not inspired. While it is true that I am not a very big fan of spirituals, that fact had nothing to do with why I found this album by the Mighty Prince Singers to be flat and uninspiring... just a lackluster performance overall. An energetic, sparkling spiritual piece can get me up and singing in the aisles just like anyone else. Here are some of the reasons why I stayed in my seat:

The recording quality is not as good as it could have been; the balance was spotty, with the bass singer sometimes blatting in your ear; the pitch and tuning was circumspect throughout, with people going flat all the time; intonation just seemed shot; the singers sounded tired and seemed to lack breath support, which really contributes to the pitch problems (especially the background parts); tempo was just as sloppy as anything else; the arrangements were consistently lackluster and just plain boring.

I actually found a couple of soloists to be quite interesting in their performances (Carl Douglas showed soul that the rest of the singers mostly lacked). But, I really was disappointed by the poor overall quality of this album. They certainly did not live up to (or even close to) their name.
Rating: 4 (3.9)


Individual Tracks

  1. People Get Ready (4.8)
    Karl Schroeder

    A pretty straightforward delivery here. It's a catchy little ditty by nature, but this never really grabbed me. Its delivery is too straight-laced, and the soloist (Carl Douglas) rarely got into making it his own.
    Rating: 5

    Rebecca Christie

    A strangely tuneless solo sets the tenor of this song, which fails to move me the way it's done here. It's definitely rhythmic, with a pleasant energy. But this song to me should be a full-fledged old-style gospel track, with Jerry Lawson resonance and a much slower and more heartfelt delivery. We need fewer verses and much more emotion. The solo is better when he lets loose a little and pushes higher, though his downward scoops - which show up a lot on this disc — are a little silly. I got to rather like the dissonant "oh lord"s that came near the end. The background sounds good on the verses, loses tune on the choruses, and just aren't locked, which is particularly disappointing because the piece is so easy and repetitive.
    Rating: 5

    Sarah Andrews Cook

    Besides being the title track of the album, this is a nice song to begin with because it's familiar to most listeners. The background achieves the blend that they do pretty consistently throughout the album. After a couple of verses of the same thing — no noticeable dynamic changes, variation of arrangement — I've heard pretty much the entire song. But it continues on for the entire 4 minutes.
    Rating: 5

    Benjamin Stevens

    Smooth blend in the voices, with a heavily-miked bass markedly standing out (he has low notes, but the smooth effect is troubled by his artificially-enhanced sound). The blend is no doubt aided by the arrangement being simple, unornamented and repetitive (in the style of spiritual, of course). Unenergetically performed, with both solo and backing voices perhaps aiming for tenderness but reaching only to "half-awake". These people aren't ready.
    Rating: 4

    John Magruder

    This song has a good sound as it starts, which makes it a good opener. but the one thing I found is that the background singers pitch slowly began sinking as the song went on. It was quite noticeable within 90 seconds, and considering it is a 4 minute song, that did not bode well. The baritone voices were the biggest sinners there (sorry, I could not help it). Was it me, or did they sound tired at the end?
    Rating: 5

  2. T.A. Thompson (4.8)
    Karl Schroeder

    This one has a Persuasions feel to it, which is nice. (They don't have Jerry Lawson rumbling down below, but hey — how many groups do?) I think it's a song about a money-hungry preacher, but I could be wrong... Anyway, pretty fun.
    Rating: 6

    Rebecca Christie

    Bass forefront in this, too loud, another repetitive arrangement. By the first listen I knew I'd always be able to sing along with it, though I'd never heard it before and wasn't paying particular attention. Another soloist who fails to inspire. Background is better, the song bops along, but nothing grabs you. I feel like nodding along pleasantly, not like clapping or even smiling in particular.
    Rating: 4

    Sarah Andrews Cook

    The bass is nice to listen to at the front end of this track, but when the solo comes in I think the bass is too far forward in the mix, and he just distracts me from the solo. There's a little more variety in this track, but that's due more to the structure of the song than anything that the Mighty Prince Singers did. The soloists are really the life of the tunes on this album, and I think that making their sound more prominent would add to the overall vitality of the effort.
    Rating: 6

    Benjamin Stevens

    Faster, with a funnier feel as well from the get-go. The arrangement again is far too repetitive to warrant an extended listen, and the solo is thin and unconvincing. As usual, the bass stands alone, the soloist gravels his way through, and the high voices dance among themselves.
    Rating: 4

    John Magruder

    A bit of a tempo boost over the opener, which helped with the tired sounding ending of the first song. The tempo suffered here though. And the background singers went flat all of the time on the notes that they had to hold longer more than 2 beats. The bass singer blatted a bit in this song.
    Rating: 4

  3. Walk on the Wild Side (5.0)
    Karl Schroeder

    The opening arpeggios on the word "sinner" were just about too much for me. But they're followed by a "unison" falsetto line by the group which really should have been left to those who have the notes. Oops. I do like the hook, though — "One day of prayin' and six nights of fun/The odds against goin' to heaven are six to one". Nice soloist, but the backup parts have a number of tuning issues to deal with.
    Rating: 4

    Rebecca Christie

    Hello? Liner notes? This is not Lou Reed (as the notes say). This is "Sinner", an old gospel favorite. As in: "One day of prayin' and six nights of fun". Solo is better than his predecessors, slightly fuller, more oomph in his delivery. Which is good, since this is a hellfire and brimstone song. "Your chances of going to heaven are six to one." It needs to be more than a nice listen. There's still a feeling of going through the motions, and he comes from the same mold as the rest and could use more resonance. The phrase "walk on the wild side" does occur a time or two, but there isn't even a Lou Reed sample. Bad album designer, bad bad bad.
    Rating: 6

    Sarah Andrews Cook

    This song is credited to Lou Reed, but other than the title I find no resemblance to his version, not melody, not lyrics, nothing. Who arranged this, or wrote the lyrics? Some nice Take 6-ish harmonies come in toward the end of this track (I hate to make too much of a comparison to the only other gospel a cappella group I've listened to at any length, since I admit I have a limited frame of reference, but it is a positive comparison at least!) The solo comes through a little stronger on this track, and along with the variety inherent in the song, this makes this song much more interesting to listen to than some of the others.
    Rating: 8

    Benjamin Stevens

    _Tame_. Somewhat call-and-response oriented, with a light bass (thank heaven) unfortunately offset by pained higher notes. The impression conveyed is that no matter the lyrics, no matter the music, the singers would approach the song in the same manner, emotively and musically.
    Rating: 3

    John Magruder

    "Hey," I thought, "Lou Reed! This will be interesting to hear". But, wait. This does not sound like the Lou Reed classic that I know. Did he write a spiritual with the same title? All I know is that the only reference to the original is the title and saying it once or twice. The background singers were especially off in this tune, with all of their long notes. Made me wish I could have heard Lou doing this instead of these guys. Though I cannot lie: the soloist Carl really wailed on this one.
    Rating: 4

  4. Christians' Automobile (4.2)
    Karl Schroeder

    More tuning problems in the backup parts here too, but Paul Carrington does a nice job with the solo. It's a goofy analogy ("Every child is runnin' to Jesus just like an automobile"), but the song is short...
    Rating: 5

    Rebecca Christie

    This is more like it. Not that there's anything too remarkable about this song or its delivery. Because of that, they sing it as it deserves, and it comes off as a nice pleasant match. One thing: There is no excuse for the last chorus to be as out of tune as it is, particularly since all the notes have been sung before.
    Rating: 5

    Sarah Andrews Cook

    At the beginning of the song, the syncopation comes through a little muddily because there's no framework to hold it up against (the bass is singing words along with the other parts, and there's no percussion). This is a song that feels like it should be building toward something, but really doesn't have a real climax.
    Rating: 5

    Benjamin Stevens

    Decently nimble solo, syncopated with backing voices (those highly rhythmic). Possessed of the same sort of jazzy gospel music as before, but without the needed energy from the singers.
    Rating: 3

    John Magruder

    Whoa, nelly. The backgrounds were flat from the get-go on this one. Tenors were the worst this time. Simple arrangement left things wide open for the singers to go flat. The pitch could not even stay put on the ending chord, with one or two voices floating sharp while the rest stay under pitch! Paul Carrington showed the only signs of excitement in the otherwise tired sounding tune.
    Rating: 3

  5. Heaven Help us All (3.8)
    Karl Schroeder

    I really like the sentiment of this song; the lyrics are quite nice. It's a shame that the lyrics and Paul's competent delivery of them are hindered (to me, at least) by the second tenor's tuning. The first tenor has a nice sound, but he can't carry the backup by himself. Tuning issues abound and take away from the message.
    Rating: 5

    Rebecca Christie

    I haven't gotten into it yet, but this group has a problem with its falsetto. The opening chords make this apparent — tuning here is generally poor, even in the context of this group. Bass is much less resonant than before, sounds like a different singer, but also lower than usual. Guess being in normal bass range could be doing this to him too, since earlier basslines were higher. Solo has nice delivery on verses, but falls to mediocrity over already sketchy choruses.
    Rating: 3

    Sarah Andrews Cook

    There's a disjointedness that comes out on this track, though it's present on other tracks as well. I feel like there are 3 distinct sources of sound - the soloist, the upper background parts as a unit, and the bass. On this particular track, there is a sense that none of the parts are really falling into a groove together, and in fact it is the bass who is the farthest separated from both the soloist and the other accompanying parts. Some of his high notes toward the end sound sharp, and as a result the tuning of parts of the song really seems off.
    Rating: 5

    Benjamin Stevens

    Again, a prominently-miked bass contrasting with harmonizing tenors, leaving the middle flat and empty. A strangely unmusical solo, perhaps aiming at a preaching style? Not inspiring.
    Rating: 3

    John Magruder

    OK, it started with the baritones this time. Flat. But the tenors did not let them stay lonely for long. By the first chorus, I was wincing because the pitch was just grating, especially when they would hit the last chord in the phrase "Heaven Help Us All". Man, is it just me or is the title an ironically fitting thing to say about this tune? Well, it's my review so it must be me.
    Rating: 3

  6. Hearse Wheels Rollin' (5.4)
    Karl Schroeder

    This one sounds like it was recorded differently than most of the others, almost as though the group decided to sing in a different room or at least play with a different reverb. The soloist and bass sound pretty much the same, but the backup is more tinny. Not a big deal, just an interesting decision. This reminds me of another classic gospel tune, but it's gonna bug me all night until I can figure it out... arrrrgh. Anyway, a decent tune and pretty good delivery, but perhaps a bit long (4.5 minutes) for my tastes.
    Rating: 6

    Rebecca Christie

    Ooh, nice tempo. Slow, you feel like swaying and snapping. Bass has some rhythm. Decent depth. Background has words, not oohs, which seem to keep tuning in check most of the song — the vamp at the end regresses. This is one of those formula echo songs — solo lines out verse, background fills in line with the same words each verse, all end singing refrain. Solo sounds like the same one from opening track — not as melodic as I'd like, but some nice moments. Generally a pleasant track.
    Rating: 6

    Sarah Andrews Cook

    Like track 1, this tune is pretty much the same thing over and over again. I kept wanting to superimpose "Oh Mary don't you weep, Martha don't you mourn" over a lot of the song. It ends with what should be an exciting build to a climax, but it feels more like a plateau that just goes on at the same level. Here's a picture of this song: ______________~~~~~~~~~~~~~~\ I think that a lot more variety would come out (again!) if the soloist was made more prominent.
    Rating: 6

    Benjamin Stevens

    The most rhythmic and momentum-oriented of them all. The bass throughout all the songs makes overmuch use of "bom" as his syllable, and is further hindered here by a severe lack of force to his higher notes. Still, a mildly pleasant change from the previous efforts.
    Rating: 5

    John Magruder

    Here is a traditional tune that to me evokes the feeling of a New Orleans style funeral. Kind of interesting, actually. Other than the soloist (Carl, who else), the song sounds tired and a bit lackluster. Though the pitch is not as bad in this song as it is in some of the previous songs. Tempo has a couple of glitches, and was that a tambourine I heard? I think so, but I only heard one short sound from it, as though someone bumped into it. They really should have cleaned that up.
    Rating: 4

  7. How Do I Say Goodbye (5.0)
    Karl Schroeder

    I think I'd get along OK if I never ever heard this song again. I know, I know, Boyz II Men didn't write it — it's far older than that, and I've heard a few gospel groups try it — but the one thing Boyz II Men *did* do was cement in most of our heads their version of it. Plus, they sang it in tune. Sorry, Prince Singers, I'd have to vote against recording this one. I'd also vote against playing with all the reverb knobs during the recording session. But that's just me.
    Rating: 3

    Rebecca Christie

    Very deliberate. As in jerky, especially at first. Background has some nice low moments with low oohs behind the line "forever's gone away". First solo is fine, if a bit deliberate — second solo is a little looser but doesn't lose it. They keep the ornamentation within bounds, which is a very smart move. Bridge note — the solo ooh-wee is slightly off-pitch. Maddening, because everyone else is more or less in pitch. Overall though, nicely considered and a good job by them.
    Rating: 5

    Sarah Andrews Cook

    This track, smack dab in the middle of the album, embodies the variety that's lacking in a lot of the other songs. The song itself is a change in tempo from the rest of the disc, slower than most of the other tracks. They make use of three different soloists, and while they all share a similar vocal style, each brings his own personality to his section of the song. The background has a lot more variety to it, and changes from verse to verse, which makes the biggest difference of all in making this track one of the most successful on the album.
    Rating: 8

    Benjamin Stevens

    Begun with lead and bass (tragically too loud for this song, missing out on the blended feel and sympathy of the original). The middle voices add a considerable depth to the sound given their entrance, improving the song as it goes on. Not badly done, but nothing to compare with the original.
    Rating: 5

    John Magruder

    Yes, this is the Boys II Men tune. If you ignore the bad start from the soloist who comes in sharp to start the song (or maybe it was the rest of the guys coming in flat... that's just as likely), and you ignore some of the bad chords that the background singers produce, you might find that this is a marginally passable rendition. I sort of did.
    Rating: 4

  8. Hem of His Garment (5.6)
    Karl Schroeder

    Weird effect opens this one — Paul sings "ohhhh" and the sound changes from a large hall to a small 1 bedroom apartment. This one has potential, but I think it could have been more effective had the group used some variation — tempo, dynamics, something. The music doesn't seem to go anywhere to follow the story .
    Rating: 5

    Rebecca Christie

    Bass and solo opening is pleasant — another slow number, another good call. Bass line gives it more rhythm than the Boyz II Men cover so you can tell it's a different song, which is all to the good. Solo is very basic, but no flaws. Just don't think about Sam Cooke. Arrangement is basic again, but fewer problems. If they were singing this on a street corner, I'd give them a buck.
    Rating: 7

    Sarah Andrews Cook

    The solo seems a little farther out in front on this track, which is what they should have been doing all along. Here is a group whose purpose is to have a message in their music, and if the message is largely in the solo, it stands to reason that the solo should really stand out. Paul Carrington does a great job with this Sam Cooke tune. Having the solo and the bass start alone together adds some immediacy to the song, though more variety (again!) in the background arrangement would have added even more interest.
    Rating: 7

    Benjamin Stevens

    A pattern among all these songs: bass/lead intro, followed by the introduction of the middle voices. The soloist does an admirable job of touching the untouchable in emulating the great Sam Cooke.
    Rating: 4

    John Magruder

    You notice how flat the guys were on the last song when they start this one. They are in the same key, but this one was about a 1/2 step higher. Not a very interesting song, musically. Kind of of slow and plodding, with the pitch threatening to go down, but managing to stay up throughout.
    Rating: 5

  9. When Jesus Comes (5.4)
    Karl Schroeder

    A nice foot-tappin' feel-good tune. Fine work by Paul on the solo, and a catchy walking bassline. Yes! *This* is the feeling I was looking for from the group. There's a nice feel to the song all around. But how to capture that energy in the rest of the songs?
    Rating: 7

    Rebecca Christie

    Nice, snappable. But shoot, boys, put some heart in it! If you're going to sing "when Jesus comes", sound like you believe it. These guys could be singing Java Jive, for all you can tell from the way they sing it. The words need some movement — crisp initial push, a little lean here and there, something to make you go mm. They are singing like Take 6, but without the spiffy tuning, spiffy jazz chords, perfect intonation and general warm and shiny glow. Which means they need some earth in a bad way.
    Rating: 5

    Sarah Andrews Cook

    Some more Take 6-ish harmonies on this track, and a nice thing is that I feel like I'm hearing each of the backing parts individually as well as together, the bass isn't sticking out as much, and the solo is prominent. This adds more interest to a song that otherwise shares the same plateau format as track 6.
    Rating: 7

    Benjamin Stevens

    The singers finally show some real feel for the music, adding a depth of emotion to the arrangement previously unseen. Some uncertainty in the timing of the first choral moment mars their efforts.
    Rating: 5

    John Magruder

    No pun intended, but Jeez, when is the tuning going to improve? Once again, things are consistently under the pitch on crucial chords. This song also has something that other songs had, but not as obviously as now: gasping on the part of one of the singers. A couple of times it really sticks out!
    Rating: 3

  10. Somewhere to Lay my Head (5.8)
    Karl Schroeder

    Back to the large hall reverb. I don't get that — all the songs sound pretty much the same vocally — same style, same arrangement technique, same soloists. Is the change in the sound of the room a sort of attempt to make the songs begin to sound different from each other? Hmm. Anyhow, a pretty good delivery overall. It's a good song, however you cut it.
    Rating: 7

    Rebecca Christie

    Much better. Got me swaying. Solo sounds like he mostly believes what he's singing, so the background gets peppier by association. Nice job, Paul Carrington. Best feeling of any solo on the disc, and decent tone too.
    Rating: 7

    Sarah Andrews Cook

    Compared to the clarity of the previous track, this sounds like the singers are in an echo chamber or something, and the middle backing tracks are lost somewhere in the morass, with only the upper part and the bass having any distinction. After some of my initial general observations, I feel like I don't have a lot to say about the individual tracks on this album. This one, for instance, goes on for a while, then ends.
    Rating: 5

    Benjamin Stevens

    Nice! Walking bass is interestingly done against the chorus. More energy during the second time around would seem to have been in line with the music, but does not happen. A solid piece.
    Rating: 6

    John Magruder

    There is a cavernous sort of chamber echo on these guys with this song. Actually, it made me think that they were in an empty church. This song has some energy and some of the best tuning on the album. That does not say that things are great, but this is a definite improvement over the rest of the album, but the recording quality is worse than the rest of the album too.
    Rating: 4

  11. Higher and Higher (4.8)
    Karl Schroeder

    I've never heard this one done as a gospel tune before "The Lord keeps liftin' me..." . The speedy tempo is a change from the rest of the CD, and the bass keeps it moving. A few more tuning issues here, especially in the bridge's unison. But a nice addition to the album (even if it *is* overdone).
    Rating: 6

    Rebecca Christie

    This is very Sunday school. Kitschy, contemporary Christian Sunday school. The lord keeps lifting me higher. Choral. Little soul. The bass seems to be trying to ignore that, but the rest of it is too straight, too dooey, and too, well, white for a black gospel group to sing, except maybe at a puppet show for pre-schoolers.
    Rating: 4

    Sarah Andrews Cook

    Another familiar tune, tweaked for inspirational purposes. ("The Lord keeps lifting me higher...") It doesn't really do anything, but again goes on for a while, then ends. There is a little unison interlude in the middle (with contrasting bass) where I can't say they exactly went flat, but I wished that they hit that top note a little higher.
    Rating: 6

    Benjamin Stevens

    I must say I am not fond of this song and therefore may be prejudiced, but this comes of as . . . undernourished. The soloist strains a little on his notes and sounds almost goofy. Again, I am just not inspired to clap or sing along.
    Rating: 4

    John Magruder

    Yes, this is the song you probably think of when you hear that title. They do a passable job of singing it, as well. The tuning and balance is questionable, but not really bad. They have a new soloist on this song, and Stan does a good job, though he sounded like he was straining on the highest notes. The tuning starts going downhill after the little part that the background singers do about 2/3rds into the song. Oh well.
    Rating: 4

  12. People Get Ready (Reprise) (4.5)
    Karl Schroeder

    Clocking in at under a minute, it's the chorus! It's also the title track, of course, and having it at both the open and close of the CD lends a nice sort of "thematic unity", or call it what you will. The reprise includes only the best part of the song, so it ends the CD on a higher note.
    Rating: 6

    Rebecca Christie

    Oh, look, here we are again. It hasn't gotten any better. If I'd been riding this train for a while, I would get off and look for one that either went where I was going or at least had some spectacular scenery along the way.
    Rating: 4

    Sarah Andrews Cook

    There's very little difference between this and track 1 except that this one is only 51 seconds long. I don't see the musical necessity of this reprise, but I'm guessing that it's intended to serve as a reminder to "get on board".
    Rating: none

    Benjamin Stevens

    This is precisely the same as before. I don't understand its inclusion on the album but for sentimentality.
    Rating: 4

    John Magruder

    It is just a little piece of the first song, and it is done with the same quality as it is the first time around. Decent soloist, poor tuning in the backgrounds. Nothing new.
    Rating: 4

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