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RARB REVIEW

Group: Extempo
Album: Channel 32

Total time: 48:05, 13 songs
Recorded 1995

Contact Information

Extempo
P.O. Box 704
Provo, UT 84603-0704
800-259-2002, 801-370-3809

Track Listing

  1. Sound Check (7.0)
  2. Every Man (Is Everyman) (7.2)
  3. Mary Mary (8.2)
  4. How Long (6.8)
  5. Summertime (8.6)
  6. Magic Carpet Ride (6.0)
  7. Bluegreen (6.6)
  8. Autumn Leaves (7.4)
  9. Killing Me Softly (6.4)
  10. Pride (In The Name Of Love) (6.6)
  11. Magalenha (8.6)
  12. I Remember When (8.2)
  13. Blessed Are (6.5)

Reviews

Overall

Matt Cohen

This is an impressive debut recording. Extempo is an excellently matched group of four men and one woman. (Is it just me, or is five replacing four as the magic number for a cappella? Must be the vocal percussion . . . ) Mary Jane Jones and Brad Ransom are the two primary leads. His voice leans more toward pop while hers bows toward jazz, but the overall sound of the group always has a hint of both no mater who's singing. The group knows their way around a cover song, but the album is also full of originals. My one complaint with Channel 32 is that Extempo needs to work on their lyric writing skills. Many of the songs can tend to be less than deep or well crafted. In the case of "Every Man (is Everyman)", one of the albums few sour notes, the lyrics are positively trite and spill over with a childish "Feed the World/Why Can't We be Friends" optimism. Fortunately, their music writing is much more mature and I'm sure their lyrics will grow to match the tunes.

On a more positive note, Extempo gives crisp performances of most of the material with some lip smackin' good percussion throughout. The album's highlights include an energetic cover of "Summertime" and the original song "I Remember When" which blends their already catchy pop song with, believe it or not, a fugue.

Channel 32 is produced by Jeff Thatcher. I mention this not because he's from Rockapella, but because he does a great job with Extempo. This is one of the best produced a cappella CDs I know.
Rating: 9 (7.6)

Brookes McKenzie

A competent enough group, Extempo has some really interesting things going on at the fringes — the songs that seem like the experiments for them are the best ones on the album. This says to me that they should take more risks. The songs that appear to be the mainstream of their repertoire - jazzy/pop originals that sound a lot like softer Bobs or House Jacks — are not as interesting in that they don't really break any new ground, and they're not really good enough to compete with the existing material. But they definitely have potential, and the songs that are on are genuinely unique contributions to the genre. They need to work on their lyrics, though, as they're uniformly cheesy. Also the bass needs to be boosted on a lot of the songs, as he sounds very far away and quiet. The percussion needs some effects or something, as a lot of the time it sounds the tiniest bit lame because it's too naked. Other than that the background (blend, etc.) sounds pretty good. A nice debut album that promises more in the future from Extempo.
Rating: 7 (6.3)

Mike Connelly

I really enjoyed this album — it doesn't have the slickest production, but the group's focused, exuberant performances, along with some well thought out song choices and pacing made _Channel 32_ a blast to listen to. The group's original compositions are really strong — if anything, I would have liked to hear a couple less covers and a couple more songs written by the group.

My one complaint about the group's sound is that female singer doesn't always seem to fit in with the rest of the group. She tends to drift toward a more classical sound, with a lighter tone and more vibrato, which doesn't match what the men are doing. Also, some of her parts seemed higher than necessary — even with the guys singing falsetto, at times it felt like there was a gap between her and the rest of the group. Not a huge deal (and it seemed to bother me less after repeated listenings), but something the group can watch out for in future recordings.
Rating: 8 (7.5)

Alison Berube Sullivan

This album is very polished and very professional. I definitely recommend this effort from Extempo. Vox One look out — with a similar mix of voices and styles, Extempo is more fun. They are jazzy, they can hold you with a ballad, and they can rock. One of the things they do particularly well is vocal "instruments," from electric guitar to muted trumpet to standing bass, not to mention their rock-solid percussion. Factor in their perfect blend and balance, and talented songwriting and arranging, and what you get is one high-quality, thoroughly enjoyable album.
Rating: 9 (8.0)

Gabriel Shabbtai Rutman

the latest extempo album is a blend of contemporary original pop tunes, some classic rock covers and a couple jazz standards. as i would expect from a professional group, the songs are performed with rare pitch & rhythm problems; they're mostly quite solid and occasionally excellent. what i find relatively interesting is that the originals on this album are much better than the covers, overall (the exception being magalenha). extempo is strong in their delivery, but i often wished that the soloists would let loose and give me that good ol' fashioned gospel wailing. i waited for that through the entire album, to no avail. but listen to every man (is everyman) & mary mary and summertime and autumn leaves & magalenha & i remember when and you'll hear the extempo that you love, singing some fresh tracks.
Rating: 8 (6.8)


Individual Tracks

  1. Sound Check (7.0)
    Matt Cohen

    A kinda-clever tribute to soundchecks. Sadly, it only flirts with the notion of people's first reaction to them as an a cappella group ("People wonder how we're gonna make the sound . . ."). The brief bridge where they pull back to just the bass line and layer on the other voices one at a time is suggestive of a real sound check, but it could have gone farther. Still, it's a solid, vocal-percussion-driven tune that serves as a strong album opener.
    Rating: 8

    Brookes McKenzie

    A cute enough song, if a little too Bobs-like, with the bass riff from "Day Tripper", but the lyrics try too hard to be clever without succeeding. Also suffers in comparison to the House Jacks' far superior sound- check song. The singing isn't bad but Mary, on her section of the solo, sometimes gets perilously close to being off-key, not to mention over-powering the mic (something that probably could have been easily fixed).
    Rating: 6

    Mike Connelly

    The lyrics are a bit corny in spots, but it's generally a clever idea for a song (and an appropriate way to open an album). There's a wordless section, in which one of the men adds a falsetto harmony on top of the soprano line (great blend), as well as a stop-time interlude with a cool bass solo.
    Rating: 8

    Alison Berube Sullivan

    This first original song is a nice introduction to the group. It is solid and steady, and makes me want to hear more.
    Rating: 7

    Gabriel Shabbtai Rutman

    how come every pro or semi pro group has a song called sound check about singing a cappella music live and how they don't instruments and stuff? this is just an observation, not necessarily bad. the obviously borrowed day tripper bass line is very cool, gives the listener something to grab a hold of right off the bat. tight percussion, tight little background licks as well (wa ka dip bow). this song never really lets loose, i kept waiting for the big screaming wail by soloists bob ahlander & mary jane jones and was disappointed by its absence.
    Rating: 6

  2. Every Man (Is Everyman) (7.2)
    Matt Cohen

    This is a potent soundscape — lots of spooky breathing and some serious bass. Good music to pop into your disc man if you want to go running at night (preferably a foggy night on a poorly lit road.) It's a shame the lyrics are so trite. The basic point is that we're all people, each and every one, so why can't we all live in peace with each other? Good grief . . .
    Rating: 7

    Brookes McKenzie

    A decent song but a little bit boring — the background never changes. The solo is fine and interesting enough, but it doesn't really make up for the background. Ending is too abrupt.
    Rating: 5

    Mike Connelly

    The dark sound and mood (and minor key) perfectly match the lyrics — an exploration of man's difficulty in getting along with each other. A sort of samba feel in the bass and backgrounds propel the song along, although the singing sounds a bit frantic in spots. Interesting use of an exhale sound as a percussive element.
    Rating: 8

    Alison Berube Sullivan

    This track is also an original piece. A wonderful song with a social message.
    Rating: 7

    Gabriel Shabbtai Rutman

    opens with a cool & sexy breathing overdub which runs throughout. this is a really really really good song, as a song, you know? written by bob ahlander, this song benefits from a great moving bass line (a la bobby mcferrin) & a sweet solo by mary, in addition to the fact that it's catchy. all the ingredients of a good song. this song was written perfectly for extempo, i feel, playing to all the group's strengths. beauty. party. yay!
    Rating: 9

  3. Mary Mary (8.2)
    Matt Cohen

    This is not a tribute to Mary Jane Jones, Extempo's lone female vocalist (although such a tribute wouldn't be uncalled for). The lyrics are actually an expansion of "Mary Had a Little Lamb." If they had approached this material with an "Aren't we clever?" attitude, this track would have bombed. Instead of striving to be clever, Extempo's goal is to have fun. And it works.
    Rating: 10

    Brookes McKenzie

    Once I got over my disappointment at the fact that this _isn't_ the great Monkees song of the same name, I liked this song well enough. It is again very Bobsesque, with a little soft-focus House Jacks thrown in for good measure, particularly the bass (when you can hear him). But it's catchy enough and although the lyrics aren't fabulous, they're serviceable. The solo, though, has an unfortunate tendency to sound like the lead singer of Journey being beaten about the head on the chorus, which is not pleasant, although he is fine on the rest of the song.
    Rating: 7

    Mike Connelly

    A straight-ahead pop tune with beat-box vocal percussion, this tune has clever use of nursery rhymes in the lyrics. A few unexpected twists in the chord progression keep things interesting.
    Rating: 8

    Alison Berube Sullivan

    The first thing about this song that really grabbed me was the phenomenal percussion. Clever lyrics as well as the good beat. Blend is great — it is hard to pick out individual voices.
    Rating: 8

    Gabriel Shabbtai Rutman

    i like this one too, although it's a little long. but FUCK this guy can sing high. amazing. if the song's gonna be this long, the lead (brad ransom, tenor, who wrote the tune) needs to go a little nuts toward the last quarter. we've heard the melody, we know it, we like it, now get down & wail like we know you can. a little looser, babe. still, this is another catchy extempo adult christian contemporary poppy groovy original. word up.
    Rating: 8

  4. How Long (6.8)
    Matt Cohen

    This optimistic ballad is a well placed break from the vocal percussion of the first tracks. The lyrics aren't grabbing, but the bridge section, with Mary Jane Jones singing some jazz riffs under Brad Ransom's leads, gives the song some urgency.
    Rating: 8

    Brookes McKenzie

    _Really_ cheesy lyrics mar this soft ballad which is mostly very Top 40, Boys-II-Men style, but there are some interesting touches to the arrangement, like the female line on the beginning of the chorus, and the almost classic rock sound of the part right before the bridge. The solo is unremarkable. Overall it isn't too bad, but it could have been much better.
    Rating: 5

    Mike Connelly

    A few nice harmonies, (I liked the bridge, which goes into minor), but otherwise this ballad is a little on the bland side. The handclap section at the end was a bit schmaltzy — it's supposed to be the big finish (with "choir" sounding backgrounds and a key change), but the overall sound isn't big enough.
    Rating: 7

    Alison Berube Sullivan

    A beautifully written and beautifully performed love song. The tenderness in the soloist's voice conveys the emotion contained in the lyrics.
    Rating: 9

    Gabriel Shabbtai Rutman

    another original by brad, not nearly as good as mary mary. i was surprised to hear pitch problems during the too-long intro and throughout this song in the solo and backups. the mix of this song also suffered, the claps sound like they're in a little box, almost synthetic, like the ones on a tr808 set. this song is just a song, it's music that really doesn't come alive, doesn't have a life of its own. it's a skipper.
    Rating: 5

  5. Summertime (8.6)
    Matt Cohen

    The percussion on this album (produced by Rockapella's resident beat box Jeff Thatcher) is top notch. It is ironic then that I'll be pointing to this song as a prime example of how to do a high power arrangement without relying on percussion (or using it at all, for that mater) for a long time to come. Mary soars on the lead vocals, but the real winner here is bass Lowell Stewart. He isn't the lowest you've ever heard, but that isn't what being a good bass is about anyway. What makes Lowell so good on this arrangement is the absolute precision he sings the percussive slap-bass line with.
    Rating: 10

    Brookes McKenzie

    An interesting take on this beginning-to-be-overdone song, on which no else has deviated from the standard version by as much as a jot. They could have gone even farther with it, particularly the solo, who could have improvised a little more. She also again has a slight tendency to lose control when singing out, which is unattractive-sounding. The scats are fairly good but not outstanding. Overall a nice version that really makes the song their own.
    Rating: 7

    Mike Connelly

    A groovin' rock'n'roll version of the Gershwin standard. There's a nice harmonization of the melody the second time around, and some great solos, particularly the first one. The bass sings some great fills. However, on his improv solo, I wish he would have worried less about accurately mimicking an instrument and just let the music flow.
    Rating: 9

    Alison Berube Sullivan

    Though this is not usually one of my favorites, it is nice to hear it performed with some life! The arrangement is wonderful — it won me over. Also notable are the great "instrumental" solos.
    Rating: 8

    Gabriel Shabbtai Rutman

    i heard extempo perform this live, and loved it. tons of energy off the top, a powerful chesty solo by mary, cool groovin backup parts, great running jazz bass lines strategically placed through the tune. a total crowd pleaser. mary does some great improv on the melody for the second time through, after the admirable solos by bob dave & brad.
    Rating: 9

  6. Magic Carpet Ride (6.0)
    Matt Cohen

    This song, with it's quote from "Magic Bus", suggests that Extempo may be able to offer listeners a taste of the magic The Blenders used to have before they got instruments and lost their sense of humor. Unfortunately, after the "Magic Bus" interlude it goes into an unnecessarily long section of sound effects — radio tuners, sirens, spoken word. . . Then, as it starts fading out, it suddenly launches back into "Magic Carpet Ride." Good song, bad production.
    Rating: 6

    Brookes McKenzie

    Overly clean rendition of a song that is _really_ hard to do _a cappella_ and have it be at all interesting. I like the interpolation of "Magic Bus" — in fact that makes it clear that they should have done the opposite (a cover of "Magic Bus" with "Magic Carpet Ride" thrown in). The other problem with the song is the solo, who sounds enough like the original to be uninteresting but not just enough like him to be an impersonation. They should have let Mary sing it or something - just to be _different_.
    Rating: 5

    Mike Connelly

    A bit of a cheesy song choice — they make it fun and high-energy, but I would rather have heard them put the effort into an original or something more obscure. Lots of flangey high "weaow" sounds and goofy sound effects (subliminal voices, backward sounds) are fun, though.
    Rating: 7

    Alison Berube Sullivan

    A tight cover. The bass is infectious, the percussion solid, and the sound effects impressive.
    Rating: 7

    Gabriel Shabbtai Rutman

    this starts with a really cool effect of something that sounds like a 24-track tape being shuttled by hand with the play heads on. cooly. however, when it kicks into this classic rock cover, it seems to lack any kind of really originality in the arrangement (until the magic bus allusion), and it doesn't really rock as well as the original. just kinda blah. more cool tape shuttling effects after the magic bus allusion, but then returns to just another cover. also, i felt like the whole song was buried under a world of effects, to the point that we lost the punch that may have existed after tracking.
    Rating: 5

  7. Bluegreen (6.6)
    Matt Cohen

    Well, the lyric writing isn't too sappy, I'll give it that. The basic idea is that the everything is going well for the singer, but he'd rather be unhappy. Interesting concept, but with all the distortion and the spoken lyrics it comes off as being forced. The percussion slams, but you don't get any real angst, pain, anger, or genuine rebellion from this.
    Rating: 5

    Brookes McKenzie

    This is one original that is genuinely original-sounding, despite some slight House Jacks influence, mostly due to the lead's cool voice and delivery. Over what is basically a drum loop (mixed way up) and slightly twittery background, he growls and talks his way through lyrics which would be cheesy were they done any other way. Plus the distortion effect on him works well. The only part I'm not so fond of is the very end which is double-time and makes the rest seem like a joke. This song basically kicks ass — there should be more like it/by him on this album.
    Rating: 8

    Mike Connelly

    The lead vocal sounds very sinister singing in the low register with some distortion effects. This tune is medium tempo with a heavy beat and funky wah-guitar type backgrounds. I liked the fast ending, although the fact that it doesn't really seem to take the tempo at which it's counted off is a bit disorienting.
    Rating: 8

    Alison Berube Sullivan

    The deep, gravelly solo on this track contrasts nicely with the upper register background parts, and heavy, driving percussion rounds out this unique original. Catchy ending.
    Rating: 8

    Gabriel Shabbtai Rutman

    by dave boyce, the percussionist. one of the things i usually love about extempo, the licks in the background, fail for me here. solo's ok, effected with some distortion or mid-range eq or something. i find the guitar-y whiney stuff which is prevalent all over the song to be nothing more than kinda obnoxious. as soon as i heard the double time part, i just thought, "no." sorry.
    Rating: 4

  8. Autumn Leaves (7.4)
    Matt Cohen

    It's slow jazz of the boring variety until the lead starts echoing lines off of a great vocal trumpet. After that the arrangement takes on a new life. Lowell does a great impersonation of an upright bass and Mary shows off her jazzy side. When it returns back to the main melody, it actually swings. If only you can stay awake through the first minute. . .
    Rating: 6

    Brookes McKenzie

    A more-or-less basic jazz song, this is pretty, particularly the understated solo and pointillist chords, but again they lose something when they speed up. The percussion on that section is rather terrible — he should stick to drum loops, because his high hat leaves much to be desired. But I like the arrangement on the second half, with trumpet-like middle parts, and the slow-down is nicely managed.
    Rating: 7

    Mike Connelly

    I was just waiting for this song to kick into double time — it finally happened, but it seemed like it took forever to get there. The "trumpet" sound used in the improv is done all right, but it has been so overused by groups lately it has become cliché (the fact that the improv is corny and stereotypical doesn't help). Also, the swung hi-hat rhythms are very square, with more of an accent on one and three than two and four. The transition back to the slow tempo at the end is abrupt and awkward, with overly heavy triplet figures.
    Rating: 6

    Alison Berube Sullivan

    Soft and gentle, the feel of this song is emphasized by its positioning after "bluegreen." The understated "standing bass" provides a wonderful backbone to the song. Effective and well- executed tempo changes.
    Rating: 9

    Gabriel Shabbtai Rutman

    actually, this is a pleasure to hear after bluegreen. just when i felt like effects and pop non-sensibility were getting this album down, i find this jazz standard very relaxing and pleasurable. wonderful bass sound and line. nice little trumpet solo, as well (i usually HATE that stuff), and a great great great bass solo. lovin' it. nice solo by brad over this jazzer.
    Rating: 9

  9. Killing Me Softly (6.4)
    Matt Cohen

    A cover of the original song, not of the Fugees remake. The backing vocals are as simple as can be. Basically, they stay out of Mary's way and let the song sell itself.
    Rating: 8

    Brookes McKenzie

    The timing of this cover is unfortunate, as it was probably written long before the Fugees came out with their version, so (through no fault of their own) Extempo looks stodgy singing a more-or-less straight cover of the original. This is not helped by the soloist's rather classical treatment of the song, either — which I would have disliked even if I had never heard Lauryn Hill's style. In fact, even though this is not at all a terrible rendition, it's not really good enough to pull its own weight.
    Rating: 5

    Mike Connelly

    I hate to say this, but this song really sounds like a mediocre college group. It's nice, but it's mostly soft, sustained chords drenched in reverb. And the female soloist doesn't bring anything special to her interpretation.
    Rating: 6

    Alison Berube Sullivan

    This track is full of tight , precise entrances and cutoffs. At the same time strong and emotional, Mary's voice is a pleasure to listen to.
    Rating: 8

    Gabriel Shabbtai Rutman

    considering the roberta flack original and last year's monster smash hit cover by the fugees, hearing extempo do their mellow "doo doo doo" version (and considering they have a very GOOD vocal percussionist IN THE GROUP, who was completely absent from this track), they were LITERALLY killing me SOFTLY with their song. shit! probably popular para los parents.
    Rating: 5

  10. Pride (In The Name Of Love) (6.6)
    Matt Cohen

    The distinctive guitar twang from the U2 original sounds a bit silly here ("diddle liddle liddle liddle"), but this version is all about the choruses which, with some nice harmonizing on the lead vocal, really fly.
    Rating: 7

    Brookes McKenzie

    An interesting arrangement is marred by the solo, whose sound is simply too soft and unfocused-sounding to pull of this song. He tries to make up for this by adding his own parts, but it doesn't really cut it. The guitar solo imitation is not as egregious as it could have been, and I still like the rest of the arrangement, although the percussion is hard to take seriously.
    Rating: 6

    Mike Connelly

    An adequate, though not particularly imaginative version of the U2 song. Some of the wordless riffs are a bit operatic sounding. Otherwise, it's well done, just fairly predictable.
    Rating: 7

    Alison Berube Sullivan

    The excellent arrangement helps to make this a high-quality cover. At times the background parts get complicated or difficult, and are extremely well done.
    Rating: 9

    Gabriel Shabbtai Rutman

    the thing that people love about this song is one thing, and his name is bono. he wails. he screams. he's sexy. he's got cool sunglasses. he doesn't have a last name. and he's not a wuss in front of a microphone. brad's lucky he can sing so high, but unfortunately he doesn't have the passion, the raw pleading LOVE. bono sounds like he's crying, in pain, in agony; brad's effortless gliding on these high notes, although impressive, is just not right for this angst filled pop rocker. i'm not even gonna touch the guitar solo thing.
    Rating: 4

  11. Magalenha (8.6)
    Matt Cohen

    Great percussion of the non-vocal variety. According to the liner notes, it's all done on a circular saw blade, some ball point pens, and other junk, but the sound is surprisingly musical. That saw blade has a xylophone-clear sound to it. It's all very well mixed with the vocal percussion and, oh yeah, some tight singing on this world music track.
    Rating: 8

    Brookes McKenzie

    The other really good song on the album, again because it's the least derivative — Vocal Sampling notwithstanding. The percussion does it for me, especially when the song kicks in and it starts to sound like Captain Beefheart. It's also nice and loud, and (probably because of this) has a great groove. The solos and the words in general sound good, particularly the fast parts, although the key change is so invisible that it makes me nervous.
    Rating: 8

    Mike Connelly

    This festive foreign language number (Portuguese, I would guess?) features lots of thumpy, driving percussion (triangle and other "real" instruments). Great dancing, partying flavor.
    Rating: 8

    Alison Berube Sullivan

    This song really rocks. Great rich harmonies, foot-stomping percussion, and sung in Spanish.
    Rating: 9

    Gabriel Shabbtai Rutman

    this is the best cover on the album. a carlinhos brown tune, with bob on lead, actually, this is probably the best track on the whole disc. it rocks. it gets better and better as it goes along, and it's funny, because it's not a cappella and i don't give a shit! it's a rocker! check 'em out! they're doing really fast spanish lyrics in tight harmony with super tight rhythm over HUGE rhythm tracks, it's like a total party on your stereo. the song is made by the percussion bed, accomplished with part vocal percussion and part ballpoint pens, screwdrivers, cardboard boxes, circular saw blade, half-inch tape reels, and some other shit, but the vocals match the groove perfectly. this track is enjoyably different from the rest of the album, and you can feel the fun they had recording it.
    Rating: 10

  12. I Remember When (8.2)
    Matt Cohen

    So pure, it floats! A great original! The lyrics are simple, but well crafted. The charming hook comes in the form of little afterthoughts at the end of lines (for example "Together side by side we go, WHO KNOWS".) The hook recurs in the verses instead of the chorus, which keeps this song gliding along. There's an ingenious fugue section that strangely fits right in with this pop song.
    Rating: 10

    Brookes McKenzie

    Another Bobs-like background, this one in particular sounds just like "Rainbird" (complete with Joe Bob's vocal delivery on the solo), which is probably why I like it. The lyrics could use some help, but they're barely there against the soft arrangement. The descant is nice, but the fadeout is way too abrupt, though — it breaks the mood.
    Rating: 7

    Mike Connelly

    A nice 'n' easy jazz waltz — it's refreshing to hear something like this as a rhythmic change of pace instead of another ballad. A contrapuntal section recalls the swinging arrangements of Bach done by groups like Singers Unlimited.
    Rating: 8

    Alison Berube Sullivan

    Light and refreshing. I love the "fugue" in this song — very original and flows nicely back into the tune.
    Rating: 8

    Gabriel Shabbtai Rutman

    nice. bob sounds very smooth on another of his originals. the fugue in the middle is written well, but performed with some mediocrity, unfortunately. but the mood of the song is pleasant, and it glides along with the aid of lowell's ever-solid bass track. he's cool. they're all cool. i love 'em. i do. i really like this track, and bob's writing in general.
    Rating: 8

  13. Blessed Are (6.5)
    Matt Cohen

    If the Contemporary A cappella Newsletter ever did a pictorial on "The Reviewers of RARB" and if I was subsequently chosen as the centerfold model, I would have to list religious music as one of my big "turn offs". But, that aside, this musical treatment of "Blessed are the meek . . . " has a simple appeal. It comes off as sounding like the long lost a cappella number from "Godspell". The only real problems are that Bob and Mary each sing the number almost all of the way through, so it's a bit too long and there's also too much echo throughout.
    Rating: 6

    Brookes McKenzie

    An original spiritual. The main solo has a slightly interesting tone, but the arrangement gets old fast — it doesn't change, and the chords, while nicely crunchy at times, aren't that spellbinding. The whole song sounds like it's about to break out, but it never does. They should have at least done a call-and-response with the male and female soloists.
    Rating: 6

    Mike Connelly

    A slow gospel number — personally, I was ready for some hand clapping and foot stomping, but they didn't kick into an up-tempo jam like I had hoped. The reverb/delay they used has an awful lot of high end - F's and S's really jumped out in the echo, which I found distracting. Generally a nice track, although I would have preferred a more energetic ending to the album.
    Rating: 7

    Alison Berube Sullivan

    A light spiritual, simple and repetitive. The style of the music reflects the simplicity of the message.
    Rating: 7

    Gabriel Shabbtai Rutman

    this is the most overtly religious of the songs, another bob ahlander original adapted from the new testament. it's basically a gospel thang. solid. i'd've loved a percussion track to have entered somewhere after the first verse. somebody just wail! please! get off! get down! jump off the altar and get down on your knees and get down with the spirit of the southern baptist gospel tradition that r&b was founded on! get up!
    Rating: 6

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